Developed by Oracle Corporation and written in Assembly language and C++, the Oracle database is a database management system that is available in 11 different versions, each version coming with different patches. The basis for the first version were put back in the 1970s but they were never officially released. This database is supported by some of the world's most renowned platforms, such as Linux, Solaris, AIX or Microsoft Windows (both the 32-bit and the 64-bit versions).

A Closer Look At Some Versions And Their Features And Functions

Taking Oracle 7 as an example, this version was released in 1992 and it was constantly improved throughout the years, with new features being added with every year that passed (some of the most notable features of V7 included bitmapped indexes, tablespaces changes, trigger compilation, context options or the standby database).

The 11G version, on the other hand, was released in 2009 and a patch was released to it one year later, in 2010. There is another terminal patch expected to be released any time soon, and this version is designed to consolidate databases, to improve the data compression ratios, to automate the key system management activities as well as to make computing more accessible than ever.

What Are The Most Notable Benefits Of The Oracle Database?

At the time being, this database is used by most large applications in the world, given the fact that it is especially designed to be performant in highly demanding and stressful environments. Moreover, this database is also designed to maintain and to protect the integrity of the data, and it is very consistent at the same time.

Another notable benefit of the database is that it is designed to monitor permanent transactions as well as all the media failures that may occur, this is why Oracle is widely implemented across various financial institutions where data protection and maintenance are essential.